There might’ve been more written about the Beatles than any other band in the history of ever and rightly so because just look at what they did do! Their crazy ride to the top isn’t as straight forward as many people believe: they weren’t this huge monster from the get go and there was a lot of ups and downs along the way (as a human being whose band has had some ups and downs saying ‘even the Beatles…’ is a bit of comfort).

I love the Beatles. And realistically who doesn’t? I’ve noticed there’s a particular type of person who can’t stand the Fab Four and if you’re one of them then God bless you, but you’re wrong.

When I was a teenager (because I didn’t care about music until I was fifteen) and my dad was big on the Beatles, claiming one of his four brothers stole his original vinyl records of them, so I had a listen and I didn’t get it. It was ‘old’ sounding and the quality was rubbish; it didn’t grab my attention at all.

It was when someone in my youth group at church around 2000/2001 said would I like to be in a ‘youth band’ to play at events and whatnot that the gates opened and my heart fully embraced all things properly to do with music. Including an appreciation of Liverpool’s finest.

They’ve been scrutinised by everyone from all sorts of angles and I’ve read a couple of biographies and spent many hours on Wikipedia learning I can about them because they’re so damn interesting.

For me, it’s listening to them with the mindset that they were the first do these kinds of songs or to really promote the sitar or psychedelica to a mainstream audience. ¬†Finding they were a five piece with two rhythm guitarists (somehow that bothers my brain for sorting out line-ups) really interests me or the sad dumping of Pete Best to have Ringo join them being part of their history piques my curiosity.

I used to have certain times when I had ‘Beatle-benders’ when I’d just listen to the Beatles again and again, maybe it’s time to do that soon, because the structure of these songs is perfect, the song order on the albums is just ace, the artwork inspired, iconic and now emulated across so many mediums. We’ve even had a go at the old Abbey Road cover. Note to self: we’ll try that again.

What am I trying to say about the Beatles in this then? They were amazing. Their songs have lasted fifty plus years and will continue to inspire musicians for years to come and wouldn’t it be nice to write songs (yes plural) that could change the landscape a little? Now while I’m up for writing a catchy tune or for people to be interested in our music and what we’re about, I’d love to write that song that really makes someone think or reconsider something in their life. Maybe a song could really effect someone at the right moment and they find comfort in a dark time.

The Beatles changed music history and their example I’d love to have in Alpha Tide.

Now for the nitty gritty: Paul McCartney hands down is my favourite member and songwriter (sorry George and John but it’s the upbeat joy of Paul’s songs I love… oh yeah and Ringo sorry mate).

Controversially, and some would say stupidly, my favourite album of theirs is Let it Be – the one where they were falling apart and which the tragic Phil Spector produced; according to Paul made it worse. The reason I love this album so much is because it’s so raw and a little unpolished with talky bits strewn between and for some reason I just click with it. Also, look at the songs – Let it Be, Long and Winding Road and Get Back which are all mega Beatles’ classics and are all in Sir Paul’s show today.

I could go on about the Beatles but I think I’ve said enough.

Tom